Just Right! Remote Collar Dog Training Guide Two-Volume DVD Set

Your Own Personal Remote Collar Dog Training Guide

If you are looking for a remote collar dog training guide to help start the training process with your dog, here are some suggestions:

First off, if you can, find a professional trainer in your area that has experience with this tool. An experienced pro can help  you through the remote collar conditioning process and get you on your way to enjoying off-leash adventures with your dog.

If you are trying to find a pro in your area, check nearby E-cademy graduates near you hereAll of these dog training professionals have dedicated time and effort to spend ten days studying at the That’s My Dog! E-cademy Program.

Since 2002, I  have been teaching the “how-to’s” of using a remote collar for training dogs to other professionals. However, since not all trainers make it a priority to learn these valuable techniques, you may not be able to find a skilled trainer in your area.

If that is the case, pick up a copy of my Just Right! DVD set and get your dog started on the right track. Remote collar dog training in a safe, efficient and humane way to train with my step-by-step approach.

Just Right! is a two volume DVD set that provides dog owners a remote collar dog training guide starting with the basics. You will learn everything you need to know as a remote collar beginner such as, properly fitting the collar, and determining the just right level of stimulation for your dog and understanding how that varies according to the distractions present.

You will be able to teach your dog to:

  • Walk nicely on a loose leash
  • Come back when called
  • Learn to Sit and stay
  • Learn to Down and Stay
  • Learn to remain on a Place (dog bed or mat)

You will also understand how to use the remote collar training to stop nuisance behaviors like:

  • Jumping up
  • Nipping and mouthing
  • Inappropriate chewing
  • Excessive barking

 

 

With the 2-volume DVD, you will have your very own personal remote collar dog training guide to reference whenever you like.  Both you and your dog will be less frustrated by ineffective training methods and on your way to more freedom and off leash fun!

 

Dog Training Help: New Resource

Dispensing dog training help and advice has been high on my list of priorities for a long time, but you probably can’t tell it from my presence (or lack of!) here on my own blog!!

I have a good excuse.

I’ve spent much of my time this past year writing and filming for my friends at Gun Dog Supply. Together we’re creating some awesome dog training tips through a series of articles and videos. It’s FREE stuff, so how cool is that?

Take a look at all these articles and let me know if you find some useful information. Knowing that a few words or a video made a difference for you and your dog is the ultimate positive reinforcement for me! Plus, feedback helps me to know if if I’m going in the right direction or not. If you have topics you’d like to see covered, please make a suggestion.

While you’re at it, you might want to pick up a copy of the latest training DVD. This new release has over an hour on the topic of e-collar training for your dog. Commonly asked questions, tips for training and lots of exceptional footage so you can see various examples and problem solving situations that can help with the e-collar training for your own dog.

Here they come!

One of the many reasons I like training with an electronic dog collar is because I believe it is a quicker path to off leash freedom for a dog.

Rather than using the tool as a “shock collar” and punishing a dog for none compliance, myself and many other professional dog trainers world-wide are using  e-collar stimulation as a prompt to gain a dogs attention in the midst of distractions. Once the tap on the shoulder gets the dogs attention we can then easily encourage and reward the positive behaviors we want, like coming when called.

Once a dog will reliably come when called they have tremendous new found freedom to run and enjoy many wonderful experiences. The electronic dog collar allows us to get to that point pretty quickly.

I shot a small video clip when working with two of our e-collar training dogs the other day. Both are relatively young pups and they loved playing with one another so we decided it was a perfect opportunity to practice their recalls when distracted.

Take a look. This was day 3 of training for the smaller white pup and week two of training for the bigger guy. We were using the electronic dog collar on both dogs, but I bet you can’t tell. There is no yelping, no fear, no pain…none of all those nonsense things you hear uneducated trainers warn you about. What you do see is happy dogs learning to stop their actions and respond when asked and the reward they earn for that is a bit of loving and then the freedom to go play again.

Teaching a dog to come when called when it is distracted really is the whole point as far as I’m concerned. That is what my version of electronic dog collar training is all about. I have a bit of  an issue with the idea of people thinking it is a recall when you ask a dog to sit/stay, walk 20 feet away and then call it to you in a fairly quiet and contained environment. That is what is taught in the majority of dog training classes and it is considered success. But seriously, how many of you pet owners actually find value in that? When is the last time you had a difficult time calling your dog to you when he was sitting in the house with nothing better going on?

Training should be about being able to call your dog when he’d rather dart across the street to see the neighbor kids, or when she would rather get the squirrel that is playing on the other end of the park. Or how about simply being able to call your dog when it is time to leave the dog park? How nice is it to call the dog to you rather than always having to have to go get the dog? Of course you can work your way to the “advanced” classes…just expect it to take months or perhaps years. That is the reality that very few are willing to tell you about when they take your money and sign you up for the next 6 week class session.

The goal we have at That’s My Dog! is to get you some real life results in a few weeks and it is what more and more people are seeking out when they inquire about training with an electronic dog collar.

 

E-collar training: What is the verdict on collar wise?

Today I thought I would share a question from a fellow dog lover about e-collar training and the concept of a dog becoming collar wise. This is always an interesting topic and helps lead all of us to better training habits. My answer is below, but please share your thoughts as well. Continue reading “E-collar training: What is the verdict on collar wise?”

“My dog likes his e-collar!”

The idea of using an electronic collar for dog training conjures up many emotions in people. For those who have had negative experiences or no experience at all, it typically goes hand in hand with ideas of pain or fear.

This is understandable given that most people Continue reading ““My dog likes his e-collar!””

A former E-collar hater’s perspective on remote collar training

The following, was originally posted on August 18, 2010 by Sarah Smith of Paws N Motion in St. Paul, MN. I’ve asked permission to share it here on The Truth About Shock Collars. I think you will enjoy Sarah’s intelligent writing and interesting viewpoint on remote training collars and their use in dog training. Continue reading “A former E-collar hater’s perspective on remote collar training”

Can Aggression in Dogs Be Fixed with an E-Collar?

Aggression in Dogs: Can an E-Collar Help?

Robin,

I was wondering if you use e collars in dealing with aggression in dogs? If so I was wondering if you can shed some light on the subject. I also wanted to take a minute to say thank you. Your information has really changed the entire way that I go about e collar training. I can not thank you enough!

Thanks,

Tony

The question above came to me a couple days ago and I thought it a great topic to bring to The Truth About Shock Collars blog.

The answer is yes, I do use remote collars as part of the training program when dealing with aggressive dogs. Using the electronic collar as a way to redirect the dogs attention is a large part of the success in how I go about rehabilitating dogs with aggression issues.

I realize that answer is in contrast to much of the information circulating on the internet. Warnings about NOT using a shock collar to deal with aggression in dogs abound. My guess is those warnings come from people who don’t use the tool on a regular basis and therefore have rather limited knowledge of how to do so properly.

Let me point out right off the bat that I don’t advocate putting a shock collar on the dog, waiting for him/her to display their aggressive behaviors and then push the button to punish for those actions. As in “That’ll teach Fido not to chase after other dogs!” Sorry but that thought process belongs in the idiots guide to dog training 101.

Unfortunately it is what some people do. And then when the aggressive behavior gets worse or the dog yelps and runs away those same people blame the tool rather than accepting the responsibility that they did not know what they were doing in the first place.

Seriously folks, if I go to the auto parts store, buy the best wrench set on the shelves, come home and lift the hood of my new Honda Element and start tinkering with the engine…..do I get to blame the wrench manufacturer when my car won’t run properly anymore? I’d say I was the problem, not the tool.

So lets discuss the highlights of how to incorporate the use of a remote collar when working with dogs displaying aggression problems.

The first and most important step is to lay a proper foundation of obedience training with the remote collar. The purpose of the obedience is to give the dog “something else to focus on” (ie. a job) when presented with situations that normally evoke aggressive responses. The dog should be introduced to the collar through the foundation and attention exercises of learning to follow on leash, come when called and stay in one place. I also typically teach a *look* or *watch* command to dogs dealing with aggression. In this way we can create higher attentiveness to the owner/handler when the dog is faced with situations where we do not want to allow him/her to focus on the trigger. This initial training should be started in situations that do not trigger the aggressive responses in the dog. It would not be fair for the dog to be learning something brand new when under the duress of those situations.

Once the dog has a solid understanding of the obedience we can begin to expose him/her to the triggers. The collar is used for the obedience commands while the dog is in those situations that previously brought on an aggressive response.  It is important to note that the collar is NOT being used to punish the dog for any aggressive response (barking, growling, lunging etc) Rather the collar is used to prompt and enforce an obedience command. The obedience is used PROACTIVELY before the dog reacts improperly. In this way we are redirecting the dogs attention away from the source of tension and back to the handler and the *job* the dog is being asked to perform.

Example: with a dog that is highly reactive to other dogs (growling, lunging, barking etc) I use the collar to enforce a Heel command and teach the dog he/she must simply walk politely near, around and past other dogs. There is no punishment for being reactive. The e-collar is used to prompt attentiveness to the handler and the Heel command.

NOTE: this is a process that is incremental and advances in level of challenge in respect to how quickly the dog is grasping the concept and being successful. If the dog can’t walk politely past a dog who is 15 feet away, don’t push him to walk within 5 feet. The goal is to keep the dog BELOW threshold and give him/her success at walking politely in the presence of other dogs.

One of the tremendous advantages of training with a remote collar when dealing with aggression in dogs is that it is far less subject to human emotion getting in the way and further escalating the problems. The handler can remain much more neutral in body language than when using other training collars or halters that require physical force.

The remote collar also has the advantage of being useful at a distance. Being able to enforce a Down command from 50 yards away, or recall a dog who is on a sprint to chase a jogger is much more achievable to the average dog owner than through any other  training method I know of

So the role that the e-collar has in dealing with aggression issues is that of the attention getter. The collar is used to prompt attention and hold the dog attentive to command even in the midst of those *distractions* (Other dogs, people etc) that cause the dog to react with barking, lunging, snapping etc.

I want to point out there are many other considerations when working with aggressive dogs and I don’t suggest the average pet owner go it alone. Find a professional who has hands on experience and a solid track record of success to help you.

In my years of dealing with aggression cases I have seen many things influence the outcome of the cases. Possible health issues (thyroid, structure problems, ear infections, deafness, and sight problems to name a few) should be ruled out by a veterinarian.

Dogs that are displaying fear aggressive issues need confidence building and desensitization exercises as part of their program. It is important to know how to properly time the use of food and other reward markers to help build confidence and better behavior with these dogs.

And there are cases where genetics are playing a major influence.

The most important consideration in determining the likelihood of success is the owner. There is no tool that is magic and will solve all the problems. And there are no absolutes in training. Each case is different. It takes consistency and dedication to help dogs that are struggling with aggression issues. The underlying cause should be understood, the triggers identified and then a plan of treatment determined.

The e-collar can be a large part of the process by being able to effectively re-direct the dog’s attention. Personally I would no longer want to work with aggression cases if I could not use the e-collar to help with the process. In my time specializing in this training I have found that the dogs learn much faster, there is FAR less stress on the dog and on the handler and total rehabilitation is much more likely due to those factors.

Here is a link to one of the many success stories we have in using an e-collar while dealing with aggression in dogs.